Black is Beautifull. Knowledge is Power.

Mission: Unify and Empower the Kemetic/African/Original People. Focus: Metaphysics, Spirituality, Alchemy, Bio-Electromagnetic Energy, and Sustainability. All Brothers and Sisters interested in these concepts, please contact me. We can chat, create, build, and encourage together. Peace, Love & Prosperity ::::
About me: Direct Descendent of the Cosmic Mother. Native from the hoods of Houston,Tejas and Sacramento,Cali. I am woman of faith, Scientist, Journalist, Songwriter::::

the-more-u-know:

Do you drink tea? There are many ways to consume the world’s most popular (after water, of course) beverage. And beyond drinking tea when you wake up or enjoying it with toast for breakfast, there are tea varieties that have been associated with wellness and medicinal benefits for generations.

Some of the most popular medicinal teas include:

  • Green Tea
  • Chaga Tea
  • Black Tea
  • Pu-Erh Tea
  • White Tea
  • Chamomile Tea
  • Hibiscus Tea
  • OolongTea
  • Rooibos Tea

Read on to learn a bit about each of these teas:

Green Tea

Green tea is often mentioned in health and wellness circles, as it is a great addition to your wellness regimen. It is lower in caffeine than many tea varieties and with its high antioxidant count, is sometimes associated with Cancer prevention, facilitating digestion, healthy metabolism, good heart health, and more.

Chaga Tea

Chaga doesn’t come from the Camellia Sinesis plant like most teas. It is a mushroom that grows on birch trees in cold climates, like Siberia.  Chaga tea comes from brewing Chaga mushrooms into a fine powder. Chaga is also used topically in creams and oils. Chaga is known for having a high antioxidant value and potential health benefits related to the immune system. It is commonly used as a home remedy for cold and flu symptoms and a number of other conditions. It’s continually being looked at for many health benefits.

Black Tea

Black tea has a place in nearly every home’s pantry and is common in many countries around the world. Whether you like a strong cup of black tea with lemon, honey, a bit of milk, or sugar, you’re doing your body a favor by regularly drinking it. There are significant health benefits for your lungs, blood flow, cholesterol levels, and more. Black tea is also available in many varieties, so you can benefit from a vast array of flavors.

Pu-Erh Tea

Pu-Erh tea is getting a good dose of attention from TV talk shows and celebrity endorsements because of its potential weight loss benefits.  But this fermented tea isn’t just good for those wanting to slim down; it’s good for cholesterol and also has some significant antimicrobial properties.

White Tea

White tea is known for a low caffeine rate and a light and silky taste. It’s can help you fight strep and staph infections, counteract tooth decay, and has some anti-aging properties as well.

Chamomile Tea

Many who want help relaxing after a tough day look to a cup of chamomile tea. The  tea comes from distillation of chamomile plants and its consumption is known for anti-stress results and has been studied as a treatment for Cancer.

Hibiscus Tea

Hibiscus infusions are consumed in a number of cultures. The flowery beverage, consumed either hot or cold, is renowned for improving blood pressure and cholesterol numbers.

Oolong Tea

Oolong tea, also referred to as wulong tea, is revered for potential help with weight loss. This tea is part of the camellia sinesis plant, and the partially fermented tea has a woodsy flavor.  Beyond weight loss benefits many consume it for beauty reasons, as it’s said to be good for the skin.

Rooibos Tea

Rooibos tea, often referred to as red tea, is known to help with digestion. This fermented tea is strong flavored, good for an energy boost, and offers a great deal of nutrients. Rooibos tea is known to help improve the health of one’s cardiovascular system, liver, and teeth.

The above list of medicinal tea benefits is not exhaustive. A bit of research can help you see why it’s advantageous to drink tea more often. Of course it’s not intended to replace a visit to a doctor, but if you talk to your doctor about upping your tea consumption there’s a good chance he or she will agree with you.

There are some delicious and beneficial tea varieties listed here. Why not experiment and try some? Consider adding an afternoon tea to your regimen or replacing one cup of coffee with one of these great teas.

SOURCE

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(via revolutionarytheoryofhappiness)

and what happened
when you left
madiba.
all the water started to weep.
and
the lands ate our feet.
and
africa had to keep
the
sky from jumping into her lap from grief.
what happened
madiba
when you left.
we got out the pots.
and put our laughter into our teeth.
and
prepared meals. so we could release you.
let you go.
as
we ground the seed.
blew the spice.
stirred
you into being gone. we ate flowers and sniffed cinnamon sticks to perfume your leaving our bodies.
what happened
when
you left
madiba.
they
came to
devour your body.
wanting us
to
smile while they plucked your eyes into
their pockets for later.
for
the time when they will make your name. a war against us.
what happened when you
left
madiba.
your people.
we softened.
and
broke. and kneeled over in pain. and sang. and threw ourselves against the walls, against each other, and hid, and opened, and tossed ourselves into work, and danced, and shrank, and closed, and ate, and bled, and held on, and ignored, and accepted, and lied, and created, and drank, and drugged, and loved something/someone/somewhere/ourselves fiercer, and rejected, and swam, and yearned, and distanced, and clawed, and touched, and some of us will disown you because you hurt too much. some of us will have to say your name for a year before we are able to sleep.
what happened
when you left madiba
is
the same thing that happened
when you came.
you lit life on fire.
so rest beloved
please
rest in ease.
knowing
we will continue to make the soft fire from our skin.
because
you showed us how.
what is left (the day after you have gone), nayyirah waheed (via nayyirahwaheed)

(via nayyirahwaheed)

nayyirahwaheed:

kingxnova:

I hold you like I held Malcolm before he went away. Before Robben and Mecca laid claim to brilliant, roaring bonfires and hushed them to quiet embers. I remember you as the man who said “it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die”, as the man who led Umkhonto weSizwe (mama le papa), as the man who said we must arm ourselves to take back our land and dignity, as the Black Pimpernel, the boxer, the lawyer, the one who survived on Madikizela’s devotion - when you were all fight and fire and flame - this is how I love you. 
Lala kahle, qhawe elihle Rolihlahla Mandela.
Because of you, Luthuli, Tambo, Hani, Sisulu, Biko, Mahlangu, Mashinini, Kathrada, Sobukwe and countless, countless others we are able to rightly walk free in this land of our ancestors. 
I didn’t think I would cry because the deification of your memory had fatigued me. But this morning, a little past midnight, I slowly collapsed into myself as I looked around me: I thought of my address, my parents’ tax brackets, my education, my flight to Cape Town in a few hours, my ability to choose the direction of my life and all the opportunities I have. Without you, without your brave peers, without my parents who fought too, without our people, without the tears and without the lifetimes and lifetimes of blood - I would surely be cleaning the house of some white family or teaching a Bantu Education syllabus to brown-skinned babies who would be forced to internalise the message that they were born to be servants. Without all of you, we would be born and die in the chains of servitude to evil, despicable people; prisoners in the only place we’ve ever known as home.
I cried when I thought of how you wore that Boks jersey and walked onto the rugby pitch in 1995. I cried when I thought of all the shuffling and shmiling you had to do to set them at ease after all they did was murder us, steal from us, rape us and plunder our resources for 300 years. I cried because you had to dance. I cried because you had to be the Magic Negro. I cried because CNN called FW de Klerk first this morning as if he hadn’t upheld the very system which equated us to animals. I cried because you did so much and yet for the majority, South Africa is still what it is. I cried because I have an amazingly privileged life. I cried because I so badly believed in a rainbow that does not exist. I cried because I choose to believe that being president was hard and you tried your best to make the best decisions. I cried because I don’t know how to process a world where you, as a man and an ideal, have to be spoken of in memoriam… 
It’s all so overwhelmingly complex. I should be in Houghton giving flowers to your memory and singing struggle songs with my kin but I’m writing this from a pretty hotel room in Cape Town, overlooking Table Mountain. This city makes me feel like I am the only one in mourning, there are hardly any brown people here. As we drove in this morning, Brenda Fassie’s tribute to you played and all the heaviness rose and fell and settled once more as I turned to my left and saw the terribly named Castle of Good Hope. History hurts.
Everything hurts but you lived and you loved and you tried.
Thank you for your life. Thank you for your spirit. Thank you for showing what it means to truly serve the people. Siyabonga, Dalibhunga. Rest In Power, eternally.
My Black President. 

holding your hand my love, as we weep and walk our elder home to the ancestors :)))))

nayyirahwaheed:

kingxnova:

I hold you like I held Malcolm before he went away. Before Robben and Mecca laid claim to brilliant, roaring bonfires and hushed them to quiet embers. I remember you as the man who said “it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die”, as the man who led Umkhonto weSizwe (mama le papa), as the man who said we must arm ourselves to take back our land and dignity, as the Black Pimpernel, the boxer, the lawyer, the one who survived on Madikizela’s devotion - when you were all fight and fire and flame - this is how I love you. 

Lala kahle, qhawe elihle Rolihlahla Mandela.

Because of you, Luthuli, Tambo, Hani, Sisulu, Biko, Mahlangu, Mashinini, Kathrada, Sobukwe and countless, countless others we are able to rightly walk free in this land of our ancestors. 

I didn’t think I would cry because the deification of your memory had fatigued me. But this morning, a little past midnight, I slowly collapsed into myself as I looked around me: I thought of my address, my parents’ tax brackets, my education, my flight to Cape Town in a few hours, my ability to choose the direction of my life and all the opportunities I have. Without you, without your brave peers, without my parents who fought too, without our people, without the tears and without the lifetimes and lifetimes of blood - I would surely be cleaning the house of some white family or teaching a Bantu Education syllabus to brown-skinned babies who would be forced to internalise the message that they were born to be servants. Without all of you, we would be born and die in the chains of servitude to evil, despicable people; prisoners in the only place we’ve ever known as home.

I cried when I thought of how you wore that Boks jersey and walked onto the rugby pitch in 1995. I cried when I thought of all the shuffling and shmiling you had to do to set them at ease after all they did was murder us, steal from us, rape us and plunder our resources for 300 years. I cried because you had to dance. I cried because you had to be the Magic Negro. I cried because CNN called FW de Klerk first this morning as if he hadn’t upheld the very system which equated us to animals. I cried because you did so much and yet for the majority, South Africa is still what it is. I cried because I have an amazingly privileged life. I cried because I so badly believed in a rainbow that does not exist. I cried because I choose to believe that being president was hard and you tried your best to make the best decisions. I cried because I don’t know how to process a world where you, as a man and an ideal, have to be spoken of in memoriam… 

It’s all so overwhelmingly complex. I should be in Houghton giving flowers to your memory and singing struggle songs with my kin but I’m writing this from a pretty hotel room in Cape Town, overlooking Table Mountain. This city makes me feel like I am the only one in mourning, there are hardly any brown people here. As we drove in this morning, Brenda Fassie’s tribute to you played and all the heaviness rose and fell and settled once more as I turned to my left and saw the terribly named Castle of Good Hope. History hurts.

Everything hurts but you lived and you loved and you tried.

Thank you for your life. Thank you for your spirit. Thank you for showing what it means to truly serve the people. Siyabonga, Dalibhunga. Rest In Power, eternally.

My Black President. 

holding your hand my love, as we weep and walk our elder home to the ancestors :)))))

(via nayyirahwaheed)

Stonewall was colored folks, poor folks, transsexuals, femmes, butches… a little bit of everybody. But the narrative that gets sold to people is that it was all these “A-Gay” white normative people. That’s not who riots. Sorry.

wakeupblackpower:

here is my lay
my copper my gold my word
the key the lock the box
the instance of sunrise
dew on the grass
melting like our hands didnt know what a touch was
until. just then.
here are my rings
round round round my knowing
hairy wrinkly all the same
fingered
here is what the moon feels like when…

We cannot advance or appropriately defend our interests and lives as an Afrikan people if we place the fate of our community in the hands of the educational establishments of our oppressors and enemies, and in the hands of those Afrikans educated in them. Afrikan peoples and Afrikan leaders should be the recipients of an Afrikan-centered education. No Afrikan should be granted leadership in the Afrikan community who has not been certified through education or experience as Afrikan-centered in consciousness, identity and orientation.

Amos N. Wilson

Blueprint for Black Power

(via pan-afrikan-education)

crackheadparis:

“The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”  - Nelson Mandela

1918 - 2013  R.I.P 

(via night-catches-us)

awkwardsituationist:

  • globally, 77,600,000 girls do not attend school
  • there are 33,000,000 fewer girls than boys in primary education
  • girls with secondary education are 6 times less likely to be married as children
  • a girl with 7 years of schooling in the developing world will have 2.2 fewer children
  • a child born to a literate mother is 50% more likely to survive past the age of 5
  • two thirds of the 775,000,000 illiterate adults, and 63% of illiterate youth, are female
  • literate mothers are twice as likely to immunize their children and send them to school
  • a girl who completes basic education is 3 times less likely to contract HIV
  • a girl earns 20% more as an adult for every additional year of education she receives
  • a nation’s GDP rises an average of 3% when 10% more its girls attend school
  • less than 2% of international development funds are specifically allocated to girls
  • school is not free in over 50 countries

sources from girl rising

photos: (1) malala yousafza before addressing the un; (2) joey l. of a school for the hamar tribe in ethiopia; (3) beawiharta in jakarta of students who risk life crossing a collpased bridge to get to school; (4) muhammed muheisen in pakistan; (5) altaf gadri of an unofficial school run for slum dwellers held under a bridge in new delhi; (6) paula bronstein of burmese refugees in thailand at a school in their refugee camp; (7) noah seelam in hyderabad, india; (8) per anders pettersson, uganda; (9) lana slezic in afghanistan; (10) roberto schmidt in afghanistan, where acid attacks and poisoning of water by the taliban is on the increase at schools for girls

(via awakenenlighten)